April 2, 2019 by childrightschat

Where are we at with.. children’s rights in Early Childhood

 

Not long to go now – here the questions/topics we will explore tonight! we are looking forward to start with a PROVOCATION from each one of you! We’d love to hear from @SheilaLongITC @DrVerityCB @gmsainz @juliangrenier @LizHillyard @EiriniGkouskou @b_merrick @tjwprice @ecrgARU pic.twitter.com/Ju1GAT1l6N

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

READY, STEADY, GO! Welcome to out first chat of 2019! Tonight we focus on where are we at with #childrensrights in #EarlyChildhood pic.twitter.com/V5z4gP4BF0

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

 

Elfas from Zimbabwe , New Hope Foundation Zimbabwe

— Elfas Mcloud Z. Shangwa (@elfas_ZS) 13 March 2019

I am a parent of a young autistic person. Lived experience for them from my perspective reflecting back on their early childhood likely not optimal in the experience of their rights, impacting their continuing experience to now being a young person @GillatCambium @CatiaMalaquias

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

Im an infant teacher in #Zimbabwe @zimta01 @ARTUZ16

— ChildrenMatter (@kudamasaka) 13 March 2019

Hi, I’m joined by @Janmgeo & we will be discussing concepts of child-centredness & how a democratic perspective of child-centredness can be combined with developmental perspectives. Our research is demonstrating the centrality of the ECEC professionals & their interactions https://t.co/pZwB6YCBdr

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

Hello Paulette here from Anglia Ruskin University and also OMEP – @OMEP_UK #ChildRightsChat #EarlyChildhood I think that @GemR77 would enjoy this chat too.

— Paulette (@ecrgARU) 13 March 2019

I’m a speech pathologist working in early intervention in Melbourne.

— Caitlyn Conway (@caitlynhconway) 13 March 2019

 

Thanks for the invite! @CRWK19 concentrates on educating the youngest children in EYFS stages in nursery and primary schools on their rights in the #UNCRC. It is run in association with @UNICEF_uk #RRSA and @BhamCityCouncil funded by @Midlands4Cities and supported by #UoB_CCN

— Child Rights Week 2019 (@CRWK19) 13 March 2019

Last year we concentrated on the #righttoshelter and this year it is on the #righttoplay. We have invited organisations to the nursery and school to teach them about play, why it is important and what makes it a right. Further information can be found on the @CRWK19 website

— Child Rights Week 2019 (@CRWK19) 13 March 2019

The #UoB_CCN will also be holding a conference on ‘play’ later this year where the two settings can showcase the work of their children. Speakers will be from the PhD research community, one of which, @naomiruthnr, specialises in the #righttoplay for children. Details are TBC.

— Child Rights Week 2019 (@CRWK19) 13 March 2019

Greetings from Dublin! Gaby here, researcher at @CHRCE_DCU currently working on agency, #ChildRights and #GlobalCitizenshipEducation. I am sure @soniailie will be happy to join us tonight!

— Gabriela Martinez Sainz (@gmsainz) 13 March 2019

Definitely @gmsainz! Sonia of @REAL_Centre here, working on inequalities in education. Mostly higher education, but it all starts in #EarlyChildhood

— Sonia Ilie (@soniailie) 13 March 2019

Hello Paulette here from Anglia Ruskin University and also OMEP – @OMEP_UK #ChildRightsChat #EarlyChildhood I think that @GemR77 would enjoy this chat too.

— Paulette (@ecrgARU) 13 March 2019

Q.1. Sheila Long, Ireland, interested in children’s rights education, and its interconnections with the professional formation of early childhood education and care students. Im tagging @alisonmoore52

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 13 March 2019

 

I think that students are very aware of children’s rights, but what this looks like in practice can be more challenging, particularly given that professionals primarily work with groups of children

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

I think we can be intentional in teaching students about children’s rights. Awareness is just one aspect of learning but possibly not sufficient for a full appreciation of the potentials, possibilities and limitations of the children’s rights framework in practice

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 13 March 2019

Please could you say which framework? I sometimes wonder whether frameworks can be constraining, so it would be good to have some context. Thanks

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

My students seem to respond a lot to @UNICEF 2014 children’s rights framework for Education – also called ‘table top’ – interested in exploring what the various ideas of framework are…

— Dr Francesca Zanatta (@DrFranZanatta) 13 March 2019

Would you feel comfortable with the idea of a competence framework for professionals to demonstrate they have identified they have adopted “children’s rights”?

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

Nope – not really

— Dr Francesca Zanatta (@DrFranZanatta) 13 March 2019

Not to put you on the spot or anything , but how do we support students in adopting a rights based perspective?

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

Oh gosh – I am still very much on trial and error – I do refer to frameworks, but I do wish I could rely more on theory and critical thinking to really dig into the beliefs and views of childhood

— Dr Francesca Zanatta (@DrFranZanatta) 13 March 2019

I think it is important that students consider their own concepts of childhood in order to reflect upon how this shapes the way they work with children – maybe this is the start of critical thinking????

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

Yes, starting with students conceptualisations of childhoods is really key, then looking at the multiple conceptualisations that have enriched ECEC for over 200 years and more recently, and giving plenty of time and space for discussion.

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 13 March 2019

In a previous tweet we referred to Lee Jerome’s article https://t.co/5GxsvmjXCg … as a great starting point when reflecting on values and roles we can adopt, when working from a rights perspective, transferable to #EarlyChildhood too

— Aline Cole-Albäck (@AColeAlbaeck) 13 March 2019

I often contemplate the rights of a child when a parent isn’t engaging in the EI service – the evidence is there that it would benefit the child tremendously, but the parents are the ones who have to decide to do the work. Eg. Hearing aid use

— Caitlyn Conway (@caitlynhconway) 13 March 2019

Conversely, when a parent chooses to do something that has limited benefit they’ve learnt about on the internet over the evidence-based practices we’re suggesting, eg diets for children with autism, which may negatively affect nutrition if the child already has a restricted diet.

If Govts are to show that they take children’s rights seriously, then all adults who work with children need to recieve appropriate, active and up-to-date information about children’s rights. Again, this is drawing heavily on UNCRC text.

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 13 March 2019

I think they also need to ensure that legislation and the governance that they have over practices and policies reflect children’s rights and meeting their own obligations. Certainly from our family’s experience and my viewpoint huge gaps exist in this regard

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

Perhaps a consideration is whether the relationship of structure and agency can be reflected in a competency framework? The question could be raised as to who defines the competencies, however, this may open opportunities for children’s engagement in a process of determination.

— UEL_MA_ECLP (@UEL_MA_ECLP) 13 March 2019

the importance of the lived experience of these rights of the children they may be caring for in association with their practice and relationships, this may sound odd but the constraints they may experience and how to overcome

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

I think it is important for students to understand what we mean by children’s rights and the contexts it is applied to. It needs to be something instilled at all levels of early childhood training, including the most basic level, e.g Level 2

— Gemma M Ryder (@gemmamryder) 13 March 2019

So would a possibility be a rights based praxis in early childhood? I am wonder if Verity has a perspective on this given her theorisation of professional knowledge. (Jenny Robson with students from MA Early Childhood at University of East London). We are following the chat.

— UEL_MA_ECLP (@UEL_MA_ECLP) 13 March 2019

I think it is important to recognise that how people come to know to work with children is shaped by a variety of knowledges – from the theoretical to our daily encounters with children. I don’t think it is about one perspective – if it was we would be stuck in that perspective

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

Jenny can I recommend your article (2016) on children’s rights in early years in the UK. Do you have a link you could share with the rest of the chatters?

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 14 March 2019

I think we also need to include the rights of families too. An integral lart of practice is often centred around working with parents and carers. Where they ‘sit’ within the context of human and children’s rights is also important.

— Gemma M Ryder (@gemmamryder) 13 March 2019

Great question from @DrVerityCB ‘how do we support students in adopting a rights based perspective?’? https://t.co/2wrYDn9T95

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

I am aware that foster care and adoption are different things, but my colleague @KirtiZeijlmans has conducted research to matching and foster care and how the voice of children are taken into account.

— Renske (@RenskeRia) 14 March 2019

I am likely not that well positioned to comment but I will respond as form of a wish list. Good knowledge on rights, what does good practice look like when rights are incorporated, and what it look likes when it isn’t,

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

I think they also need to ensure that legislation and the governance that they have over practices and policies reflect children’s rights and meeting their own obligations. Certainly from our family’s experience and my viewpoint huge gaps exist in this regard

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

— Caitlyn Conway (@caitlynhconway) 13 March 2019

Ah, yes @CRWK, I suggested earlier today we need to challenge the notion children “belong” to parents (as stated in the article). I said: children are human beings we share our lives with. They’re not the “property”of parents.

— Aline Cole-Albäck (@AColeAlbaeck) 13 March 2019

I suppose it’s how we interpret ‘belonging’ – whether it’s as a possession or as a connection

— Paulette (@ecrgARU) 13 March 2019

Good point. I have unfortunately in cases of separation often heard Mums say the child is “mine” so I wish the Dad would leave us alone …

— Aline Cole-Albäck (@AColeAlbaeck) 13 March 2019

#Hottopics @ChildRightsChat For our family meaningful centering of the person with imposed therapy regimes and restrictive practices -restraint in early childhood care

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

Our research has identified that whilst democratic perspectives are embedded in concepts of child-centredness, they have to be juggled with developmental & romantic conceptions – inevitably, the national context you are in impacts on the juggling act https://t.co/sGCYUmdG3E

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

 

Major challenges in #Africa is resources commitment by duty bears. We have good theories that connect child rights framework but putting into practice require resources

— ChildrenMatter (@kudamasaka) 13 March 2019

 

We need to empower children to demand their rights. Their own agency is important

— ChildrenMatter (@kudamasaka) 13 March 2019

 

As a parent continual discussions and research which is inclusive to the input/participation/lived experience of all stakeholders most importantly children and young people themselves

— Danielle Lawless (@DanielleLawles8) 13 March 2019

 

The whole topic raises many issues which can help practitioners and students to frame questions like – what is a child? why are some children valued more than others? how can we foster agency and participation? #childrightschat

— Kay Sidebottom (@KaySocLearn) 13 March 2019

 

Why are some children valued more than others? What children count and are counted @FDonson @colettemurray14

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 13 March 2019

 

The very fact we are having this conversation will help to advance our understandings – maybe challenge them for a while to start with, but ultimately we need to question what we think we ‘know’ about children’s rights

— Verity Campbell-Barr (@DrVerityCB) 13 March 2019

 

Perhaps the most #hotTopic for this chat: do we question ‘enough’ what we think we ‘know’ about children’s rights? Does this link also to the point shared by @Janmgeo with regards to children not wanting the spot-light in child-centred practices? 1/2 https://t.co/h8BZyRP9pW

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

 

We are loving the discussion tonight – lots of agreement around interconnectedness between theory/practices/practices but also children/parents/practitioners/community https://t.co/5kf5EUWEug

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

 

In Africa will say ‘a communal child’. Every has a shared responsibility for children https://t.co/FkEwXNjzDM

— ChildrenMatter (@kudamasaka) 13 March 2019

 

https://t.co/v1DDy01QAu book by my lovely colleague and friend Mallika Kanyal but I don’t think that she’s on Twitter!

— Paulette (@ecrgARU) 13 March 2019

 

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We sure do want more theory @DrFranZanatta -This forthcoming publication by @noamPeleg explores respect for children's agency and human dignity in the present, in the process of growth, and in the outcomes of this process when the child becomes an adult https://t.co/Os3s3nskfz

— Dr Sheila Long (@SheilaLongITC) 14 March 2019

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Check out some of the work being done @SELB_QUT @ChildRightsQUB @CCC_QUT

— Jenna Gillett-Swan (@jkgillettswan) 13 March 2019

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We had lots of threads tonight – thank you so much for making the discussion so relevant and on point. Lots of learning – will try to storify the chat, so that we can all review and reflect further on the many points raised. Please do continue to read and answer and CHAT!

— #ChildRightsChat (@ChildRightsChat) 13 March 2019

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